LONDON  +  NEW YORK  |  INFO@THECURATEURCOLLECTIVE.COM

  • the curateur collective

[RECENT]

PUBLIC HOTEL, BY IAN SCHRAGER

THE NIGHT YOU LEFT

 

TOWNHOUSE, GREENWICH VILLAGE

DRAWING AS PORTAL

SOHO HOUSE/ LUDLOW HOUSE

FEMALE ARTISTS, SOCIAL CHANGE

393 NYC

GLORY, GLORY

THE STANDARD 

STANDARD LINES

TIMES SQUARE

THE SKIN WE ARE IN

BLENDER

SUBLIME AND THE PERCEPTIVE

ALL TOO HUMAN

COMING IN A LITTLE HOT

HOTEL AMERICANO 

BVF SELECTIONS

Announcing The Sublime and the Perceptive, curated by Emie Diamond, which opens during Frieze New York and will remain on view at 135 Madison Avenue for the next three months.

Named Sublime and the Perceptive, a reference to Edmund Burke, this exhibition explores the complexities of cognition as influenced by passion, imagination and deception, analyzing whether beauty elevates or grounds the viewer. 

 

Delving deep into the photographic practices of the New York-based artists featured in the show, preconceived notions will be shattered as viewers ponder what is natural vs. manipulated, deciphering forms of distortion, beauty, and what exists in between. An underlying subtlety of the female figure is present throughout the show, further suggesting how cognitive biases, selective perception and perceptual distortion impact a viewer.

 

In the highlighted work on the invitation, Zen, by Texas born Jamie Nelson captures a thoroughly ethereal image, provoking a warmth of familiarity in the unique combination of fine art and contemporary visual culture. The desaturated hues and positioning of the figure present a fantastical setting, suggesting an allusion to Maxfield Parrish and his famously idealized neo-classical imagery. The cloud formations reflecting in the water formation distinctly capture the viewer’s imagination, erg-ing at us whether they are of this earth.

 

In viewing Protest by Spain’s Felix R. Cid, from afar the work appears to be an abstracted entity. Nearing closer to the piece, it becomes apparent that the small specs are actually images of humans, masses of them. Upon closer inspection figures loom over each other and there is a recognition that these groupings of people are in fact painstakingly collaged and culminated to create the impression of a whole. The viewer’s eye encounters several intriguing layers of distortion, directly challenging their initial perception of the piece.

 

Daisy Johnson, a native New Yorker, is best known for her images which feature the female form. In one of her works in the show, Miriam, Wilson Canyon depicts a nude figure stretched with the expansiveness of the red stone canyon framing her. A bold layering of rock depicting thousands of years of time passed and in the foreground the subject’s figure follows the contour of the canyon. In Johnson’s second photograph, Hayley, White Pockets, the figure is further immersed in the rugged landscape, providing a darker, harsher contrast between humanity and nature. While both images in the diptych present similar compositional elements, they illicit unique viewer experiences.

 

Job Piston, an artist of Taiwanese roots, will be exhibiting his work Untitled (Dynamite) for the first time. Entrancingly obscured by distortion, the subject presents a distinctly sensual mysteriousness. Fog, smoke, plastic, a camera flash, all gently cloak the figure.  The viewer will likely wrestle with this work at length, for there are an array of elements evoking a response, what is real, what is visual distortion, perhaps they merely one of the same.

 

Charlie Rubin, of New York, will be exhibiting several of his works, including All Your Dreams Belong to Us, Full Moon, and Untitled 1. The viewer will first observe familiar natural landscapes, yet after a few moments details within the work will begin to provoke the eye. All Your Dreams Belong to Us presents a comfortably familiar visual composition of a tree in a forrest, yet the range of colors disrupts the viewer and they consider their own reality. Rubin’s process-based photography has been coined “The New Formalism.”